draft-ietf-v6ops-unique-ipv6-prefix-per-host-05.txt   draft-ietf-v6ops-unique-ipv6-prefix-per-host-06.txt 
v6ops J. Brzozowski v6ops J. Brzozowski
Internet-Draft Comcast Cable Internet-Draft Comcast Cable
Intended status: Informational G. Van De Velde Intended status: Informational G. Van De Velde
Expires: December 28, 2017 Nokia Expires: January 1, 2018 Nokia
June 26, 2017 June 30, 2017
Unique IPv6 Prefix Per Host Unique IPv6 Prefix Per Host
draft-ietf-v6ops-unique-ipv6-prefix-per-host-05 draft-ietf-v6ops-unique-ipv6-prefix-per-host-06
Abstract Abstract
In some IPv6 environments, the need has arisen for hosts to be able In some IPv6 environments, the need has arisen for hosts to be able
to utilize a unique IPv6 prefix, even though the link or media may be to utilize a unique IPv6 prefix, even though the link or media may be
shared. Typically hosts (subscribers) on a shared network, either shared. Typically hosts (subscribers) on a shared network, either
wired or wireless, such as Ethernet, WiFi, etc., will acquire unique wired or wireless, such as Ethernet, WiFi, etc., will acquire unique
IPv6 addresses from a common IPv6 prefix that is allocated or IPv6 addresses from a common IPv6 prefix that is allocated or
assigned for use on a specific link. assigned for use on a specific link.
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on December 28, 2017. This Internet-Draft will expire on January 1, 2018.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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IPv6 gateway, the IPv6 prefix information, the DNS information IPv6 gateway, the IPv6 prefix information, the DNS information
RFC8106 [RFC8106], and the remaining information required to RFC8106 [RFC8106], and the remaining information required to
establish globally routable IPv6 connectivity. For that purpose, the establish globally routable IPv6 connectivity. For that purpose, the
the UE/subscriber sends a RS (Router Solicitation) message. the UE/subscriber sends a RS (Router Solicitation) message.
The First Hop Router receives this UE/subscriber RS message and The First Hop Router receives this UE/subscriber RS message and
starts the process to compose the response to the UE/subscriber starts the process to compose the response to the UE/subscriber
originated RS message. The First Hop Provider Router will answer originated RS message. The First Hop Provider Router will answer
using a unicast RA (Router Advertisement) to the UE/subscriber. This using a unicast RA (Router Advertisement) to the UE/subscriber. This
RA contains two important parameters for the EU/subscriber to RA contains two important parameters for the EU/subscriber to
consume: (1) a Unique IPv6 prefix (most likely a /64 prefix consume: a Unique IPv6 prefix (currently a /64 prefix) and some
consistent with RFC7608 [RFC7608]) and (2) flags. The Unique IPv6 flags. The Unique IPv6 prefix can be derived from a locally managed
prefix can be derived from a locally managed pool or aggregate IPv6 pool or aggregate IPv6 block assigned to the First Hop Provider
block assigned to the First Hop Provider Router or from a centrally Router or from a centrally allocated pool. The flags indicate to the
allocated pool. The flags indicate to the UE/subscriber to use SLAAC UE/subscriber to use SLAAC and/or DHCPv6 for address assignment; it
and/or DHCPv6 for address assignment; it may indicate if the may indicate if the autoconfigured address is on/off-link and if
autoconfigured address is on/off-link and if 'Other' information 'Other' information (e.g. DNS server address) needs to be requested.
(e.g. DNS server address) needs to be requested.
The IPv6 RA flags used for best common practice in IPv6 SLAAC based The IPv6 RA flags used for best common practice in IPv6 SLAAC based
Provider managed shared networks are: Provider managed shared networks are:
o M-flag = 0 (UE/subscriber address is not managed through DHCPv6), o M-flag = 0 (UE/subscriber address is not managed through DHCPv6),
this flag may be set to 1 in the future if/when DHCPv6 prefix this flag may be set to 1 in the future if/when DHCPv6 prefix
delegation support is desired) delegation support is desired)
o O-flag = 1 (DHCPv6 is used to request configuration information o O-flag = 1 (DHCPv6 is used to request configuration information
i.e. DNS, NTP information, not for IPv6 addressing) i.e. DNS, NTP information, not for IPv6 addressing)
o A-flag = 1 (The UE/subscriber can configure itself using SLAAC) o A-flag = 1 (The UE/subscriber can configure itself using SLAAC)
o L-flag = 0 (the prefix is not an on-link prefix, which means that o L-flag = 0 (the prefix is not an on-link prefix, which means that
the UE/subscriber will NEVER assume destination addresses that the UE/subscriber will NEVER assume destination addresses that
match the prefix are on-link and will ALWAYS send packets to those match the prefix are on-link and will ALWAYS send packets to those
addresses to its default gateway.) addresses to the appropriate gateway according to route selection
rules.)
The use of a unique IPv6 prefix per UE adds an additional level of The use of a unique IPv6 prefix per UE adds an additional level of
protection and efficiency as it relates to how IPv6 Neighbor protection and efficiency as it relates to how IPv6 Neighbor
Discovery and Router Discovery processing. Since the UE has a unique Discovery and Router Discovery processing. Since the UE has a unique
IPv6 prefix all traffic by default will be directed to the First Hop IPv6 prefix all traffic by default will be directed to the First Hop
provider router. Further, the flag combinations documented above provider router. Further, the flag combinations documented above
maximise the IPv6 configurations that are available by hosts maximise the IPv6 configurations that are available by hosts
including the use of privacy IPv6 addressing. including the use of privacy IPv6 addressing.
The architected result of designing the RA as documented above is The architected result of designing the RA as documented above is
skipping to change at page 8, line 20 skipping to change at page 8, line 20
[RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless [RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless
Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862,
DOI 10.17487/RFC4862, September 2007, DOI 10.17487/RFC4862, September 2007,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4862>. <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4862>.
[RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy [RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy
Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in
IPv6", RFC 4941, DOI 10.17487/RFC4941, September 2007, IPv6", RFC 4941, DOI 10.17487/RFC4941, September 2007,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4941>. <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4941>.
[RFC7608] Boucadair, M., Petrescu, A., and F. Baker, "IPv6 Prefix
Length Recommendation for Forwarding", BCP 198, RFC 7608,
DOI 10.17487/RFC7608, July 2015,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7608>.
[RFC7934] Colitti, L., Cerf, V., Cheshire, S., and D. Schinazi, [RFC7934] Colitti, L., Cerf, V., Cheshire, S., and D. Schinazi,
"Host Address Availability Recommendations", BCP 204, "Host Address Availability Recommendations", BCP 204,
RFC 7934, DOI 10.17487/RFC7934, July 2016, RFC 7934, DOI 10.17487/RFC7934, July 2016,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7934>. <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7934>.
[RFC8106] Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli, [RFC8106] Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli,
"IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration", "IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration",
RFC 8106, DOI 10.17487/RFC8106, March 2017, RFC 8106, DOI 10.17487/RFC8106, March 2017,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8106>. <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8106>.
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