draft-ietf-v6ops-mobile-device-profile-02.txt   draft-ietf-v6ops-mobile-device-profile-03.txt 
V6OPS Working Group D. Binet V6OPS Working Group D. Binet
Internet-Draft M. Boucadair Internet-Draft M. Boucadair
Intended status: Informational France Telecom Intended status: Informational France Telecom
Expires: October 28, 2013 A. Vizdal Expires: October 31, 2013 A. Vizdal
Deutsche Telekom AG Deutsche Telekom AG
C. Byrne C. Byrne
T-Mobile T-Mobile
G. Chen G. Chen
China Mobile China Mobile
April 26, 2013 April 29, 2013
Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Profile for 3GPP Mobile Devices Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Profile for 3GPP Mobile Devices
draft-ietf-v6ops-mobile-device-profile-02 draft-ietf-v6ops-mobile-device-profile-03
Abstract Abstract
This document specifies an IPv6 profile for 3GPP mobile devices. It This document specifies an IPv6 profile for 3GPP mobile devices. It
lists the set of features a 3GPP mobile device is to be compliant lists the set of features a 3GPP mobile device is to be compliant
with to connect to an IPv6-only or dual-stack wireless network with to connect to an IPv6-only or dual-stack wireless network
(including 3GPP cellular network and IEEE 802.11 network). (including 3GPP cellular network and IEEE 802.11 network).
This document defines a different profile than the one for general This document defines a different profile than the one for general
connection to IPv6 cellular networks defined in connection to IPv6 cellular networks defined in
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on October 28, 2013. This Internet-Draft will expire on October 31, 2013.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2013 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2013 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.1. Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1. Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.2. Special Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2. Special Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2. Connectivity Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. Connectivity Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.1. WLAN Connectivity Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.1. WLAN Connectivity Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3. Advanced Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3. Advanced Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4. Cellular Devices with LAN Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4. Cellular Devices with LAN Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5. APIs & Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5. APIs & Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
IPv6 deployment in 3GPP mobile networks is the only perennial IPv6 deployment in 3GPP mobile networks is the only perennial
solution to the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses in those networks. solution to the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses in those networks.
Several mobile operators have already deployed IPv6 or are in the Several mobile operators have already deployed IPv6 or are in the
pre-deployment phase. One of the major hurdles encountered by mobile pre-deployment phase. One of the major hurdles encountered by mobile
operators is the availability of non-broken IPv6 implementation in operators is the availability of non-broken IPv6 implementation in
mobile devices. mobile devices.
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REQ#7: The cellular host MUST comply with Section 5.6.1 of REQ#7: The cellular host MUST comply with Section 5.6.1 of
[RFC6434]. If the MTU used by cellular hosts is larger than [RFC6434]. If the MTU used by cellular hosts is larger than
1280 bytes, they can rely on Path MTU discovery function to 1280 bytes, they can rely on Path MTU discovery function to
discover the real path MTU. discover the real path MTU.
REQ#8: The cellular host MUST support IPv6 Stateless Address REQ#8: The cellular host MUST support IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration ([RFC4862]) apart from the exceptions noted in Autoconfiguration ([RFC4862]) apart from the exceptions noted in
[TS.23060] (3G) and [TS.23401] (LTE): [TS.23060] (3G) and [TS.23401] (LTE):
Stateless mode is the only way to configure a cellular host. Stateless mode is the only way to configure a cellular host.
The GGSN must allocate a prefix that is unique within its The GGSN/PGW must allocate a prefix that is unique within its
scope to each primary PDP-Context. scope to each primary PDP-Context.
To configure its link local address, the cellular host MUST To configure its link local address, the cellular host MUST
use the Interface Identifier conveyed in 3GPP PDP-Context use the Interface Identifier conveyed in 3GPP PDP-Context
setup signaling received from a GGSN/PGW. The cellular host setup signaling received from a GGSN/PGW. The cellular host
may use a different Interface Identifiers to configure its may use a different Interface Identifiers to configure its
global addresses (see also REQ#23 about privacy addressing global addresses (see also REQ#23 about privacy addressing
requirement). requirement).
For more details, refer to [RFC6459] and For more details, refer to [RFC6459] and
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halving the delegated prefix and assigning the WAN prefix halving the delegated prefix and assigning the WAN prefix
out of the 1st half and the prefix to be delegated to the out of the 1st half and the prefix to be delegated to the
terminal from the 2nd half). terminal from the 2nd half).
REQ#28: The cellular device MUST be compliant with the CPE REQ#28: The cellular device MUST be compliant with the CPE
requirements specified in [RFC6204]. requirements specified in [RFC6204].
REQ#29: For deployments requiring to share the same /64 prefix, the REQ#29: For deployments requiring to share the same /64 prefix, the
cellular device SHOULD support [I-D.ietf-v6ops-64share] to cellular device SHOULD support [I-D.ietf-v6ops-64share] to
enable sharing a /64 prefix between the 3GPP interface towards enable sharing a /64 prefix between the 3GPP interface towards
the GGSN (WAN interface) and the LAN interfaces. the GGSN/PGW (WAN interface) and the LAN interfaces.
REQ#30: The cellular device SHOULD support the Customer Side REQ#30: The cellular device SHOULD support the Customer Side
Translator (CLAT) [RFC6877]. Translator (CLAT) [RFC6877].
Various IP devices are likely to be connected to cellular Various IP devices are likely to be connected to cellular
device, acting as a CPE. Some of these devices can be device, acting as a CPE. Some of these devices can be
dual-stack, others are IPv6-only or IPv4-only. IPv6-only dual-stack, others are IPv6-only or IPv4-only. IPv6-only
connectivity for cellular device does not allow IPv4-only connectivity for cellular device does not allow IPv4-only
sessions to be established for hosts connected on the LAN sessions to be established for hosts connected on the LAN
segment of cellular devices. segment of cellular devices.
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from devices located on LAN segment side and target IPv4 from devices located on LAN segment side and target IPv4
nodes, a solution consists in integrating the CLAT function nodes, a solution consists in integrating the CLAT function
in the cellular device. As elaborated in Section 2, the in the cellular device. As elaborated in Section 2, the
CLAT function allows also IPv4 applications to continue CLAT function allows also IPv4 applications to continue
running over an IPv6-only host. running over an IPv6-only host.
REQ#31: If a RA MTU is advertised from the 3GPP network, the REQ#31: If a RA MTU is advertised from the 3GPP network, the
cellular device SHOULD relay that upstream MTU information to cellular device SHOULD relay that upstream MTU information to
the downstream attached LAN devices in RA. the downstream attached LAN devices in RA.
Since 3GPP networks extensively use IP-in-IP/UDP GTP
tunnels, the effective MTU is frequently effectively
reduced to 1440 bytes. While a host may generate packets
with an MTU of 1500 bytes, this results in undesirable
fragmentation of the GTP IP/UDP packets.
Receiving and relaying RA MTU values facilitates a more Receiving and relaying RA MTU values facilitates a more
harmonious functioning of the mobile core network where end harmonious functioning of the mobile core network where end
nodes transmit packets that do not exceed the MTU size of nodes transmit packets that do not exceed the MTU size of
the mobile network's GTP tunnels. the mobile network's GTP tunnels.
[TS.23060] indicates providing a link MTU value of 1358 [TS.23060] indicates providing a link MTU value of 1358
octets to the 3GPP cellular device will prevent the IP octets to the 3GPP cellular device will prevent the IP
layer fragmentation within the transport network between layer fragmentation within the transport network between
the cellular device and the GGSN/PGW. the cellular device and the GGSN/PGW.
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