draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv6-cpe-router-06.txt   draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv6-cpe-router-07.txt 
Internet Engineering Task Force H. Singh Internet Engineering Task Force H. Singh
Internet-Draft W. Beebee Internet-Draft W. Beebee
Intended status: Informational Cisco Systems, Inc. Intended status: Informational Cisco Systems, Inc.
Expires: December 6, 2010 C. Donley Expires: February 12, 2011 C. Donley
CableLabs CableLabs
B. Stark B. Stark
AT&T AT&T
O. Troan, Ed. O. Troan, Ed.
Cisco Systems, Inc. Cisco Systems, Inc.
June 4, 2010 August 11, 2010
Basic Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers Basic Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers
draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv6-cpe-router-06 draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv6-cpe-router-07
Abstract Abstract
This document specifies requirements for an IPv6 Customer Edge (CE) This document specifies requirements for an IPv6 Customer Edge (CE)
router. Specifically, the current version of this document focuses router. Specifically, the current version of this document focuses
on the basic provisioning of an IPv6 CE router and the provisioning on the basic provisioning of an IPv6 CE router and the provisioning
of IPv6 hosts attached to it. of IPv6 hosts attached to it.
Status of this Memo Status of this Memo
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on December 6, 2010. This Internet-Draft will expire on February 12, 2011.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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1.1. Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1. Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.1. Current IPv4 End-user Network Architecture . . . . . . . . 4 3.1. Current IPv4 End-user Network Architecture . . . . . . . . 4
3.2. IPv6 End-user Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.2. IPv6 End-user Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
4. Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4. Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.1. General Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.1. General Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.2. WAN Side Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.2. WAN Side Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.3. LAN Side Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4.3. LAN Side Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.4. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4.4. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
6. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 6. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
8. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
8.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
8.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 8.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
This document defines basic IPv6 features for a residential or small This document defines basic IPv6 features for a residential or small
office router referred to as an IPv6 CE router. Typically these office router referred to as an IPv6 CE router. Typically these
routers also support IPv4. routers also support IPv4.
Mixed environments of dual-stack hosts and IPv6-only hosts (behind Mixed environments of dual-stack hosts and IPv6-only hosts (behind
the CE router) can be more complex if the IPv6-only devices are using the CE router) can be more complex if the IPv6-only devices are using
a translator to access IPv4 servers [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-framework]. a translator to access IPv4 servers [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-framework].
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o Provisioning of the LAN interfaces o Provisioning of the LAN interfaces
Unique Local IPv6 Unicast Addresses (ULA) [RFC4193] are used by hosts Unique Local IPv6 Unicast Addresses (ULA) [RFC4193] are used by hosts
communicating within the End-user Network; this is functionally communicating within the End-user Network; this is functionally
similar to RFC1918 addresses used within an IPv4 End-user Network. similar to RFC1918 addresses used within an IPv4 End-user Network.
The IPv6 CE router defaults to acting as the demarcation point The IPv6 CE router defaults to acting as the demarcation point
between two networks by providing a ULA boundary, a multicast zone between two networks by providing a ULA boundary, a multicast zone
boundary and ingress and egress traffic filters. boundary and ingress and egress traffic filters.
For IPv6 multicast traffic the IPv6 CE router may act as an MLD proxy For IPv6 multicast traffic the IPv6 CE router may act as an Multicast
[RFC4605] and may support a dynamic multicast routing protocol. Listener Discovery (MLD) proxy [RFC4605] and may support a dynamic
multicast routing protocol.
The IPv6 CE router may be manually configured in an arbitrary The IPv6 CE router may be manually configured in an arbitrary
topology with a dynamic routing protocol. Automatic provisioning and topology with a dynamic routing protocol. Automatic provisioning and
configuration is described for a single IPv6 CE router only. configuration is described for a single IPv6 CE router only.
4. Requirements 4. Requirements
4.1. General Requirements 4.1. General Requirements
The IPv6 CE router is responsible for implementing IPv6 routing; that The IPv6 CE router is responsible for implementing IPv6 routing; that
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Router Discovery as specified in [RFC4861] to discover a Router Discovery as specified in [RFC4861] to discover a
default router(s) and install default route(s) in its routing default router(s) and install default route(s) in its routing
table with the discovered router's address as the next-hop. table with the discovered router's address as the next-hop.
W-4: The router MUST act as a requesting router for the purposes of W-4: The router MUST act as a requesting router for the purposes of
DHCPv6 prefix delegation ([RFC3633]). DHCPv6 prefix delegation ([RFC3633]).
W-5: DHCPv6 address assignment (IA_NA) and DHCPv6 prefix delegation W-5: DHCPv6 address assignment (IA_NA) and DHCPv6 prefix delegation
(IA_PD) SHOULD be done as a single DHCPv6 session. (IA_PD) SHOULD be done as a single DHCPv6 session.
W-6: The IPv6 CE router MUST use a persistent DUID for DHCPv6
messages. The DUID MUST NOT change between network interface
resets or IPv6 CE router reboot.
Link-layer requirements: Link-layer requirements:
WLL-1: If the WAN interface supports Ethernet encapsulation, then WLL-1: If the WAN interface supports Ethernet encapsulation, then
the IPv6 CE router MUST support IPv6 over Ethernet [RFC2464]. the IPv6 CE router MUST support IPv6 over Ethernet [RFC2464].
WLL-2: If the WAN interface supports PPP encapsulation the IPv6 CE WLL-2: If the WAN interface supports PPP encapsulation the IPv6 CE
router MUST support IPv6 over PPP [RFC5072]. router MUST support IPv6 over PPP [RFC5072].
WLL-3: If the WAN interface supports PPP encapsulation, in a dual- WLL-3: If the WAN interface supports PPP encapsulation, in a dual-
stack environment with IPCP and IPV6CP running over one PPP stack environment with IPCP and IPV6CP running over one PPP
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when some addresses covered by the aggregate are not when some addresses covered by the aggregate are not
reachable [RFC4632]. reachable [RFC4632].
(a) The IPv6 CE router SHOULD send an ICMPv6 Destination (a) The IPv6 CE router SHOULD send an ICMPv6 Destination
Unreachable according to section 3.1 [RFC4443] back to Unreachable according to section 3.1 [RFC4443] back to
the source of the packet, if the packet is to be dropped the source of the packet, if the packet is to be dropped
due to this rule. due to this rule.
WPD-7: If the IPv6 CE router requests both an IA_NA and an IA_PD in WPD-7: If the IPv6 CE router requests both an IA_NA and an IA_PD in
DHCPv6, it MUST accept an IA_PD in DHCPv6 Advertise/Reply DHCPv6, it MUST accept an IA_PD in DHCPv6 Advertise/Reply
messages, even if the message does not contain any addresses messages, even if the message does not contain any addresses.
(IA_NA options with status code equal to NoAddrsAvail).
WPD-8: By default an IPv6 CE router MUST NOT initiate any dynamic WPD-8: By default an IPv6 CE router MUST NOT initiate any dynamic
routing protocol on its WAN interface. routing protocol on its WAN interface.
4.3. LAN Side Configuration 4.3. LAN Side Configuration
The IPv6 CE router distributes configuration information obtained The IPv6 CE router distributes configuration information obtained
during WAN interface provisioning to IPv6 hosts and assists IPv6 during WAN interface provisioning to IPv6 hosts and assists IPv6
hosts in obtaining IPv6 addresses. It also supports connectivity of hosts in obtaining IPv6 addresses. It also supports connectivity of
these devices in the absence of any working WAN interface. these devices in the absence of any working WAN interface.
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period, then the IPv6 CE router MUST immediately advertise the period, then the IPv6 CE router MUST immediately advertise the
old prefix with a preferred lifetime of 0 and a valid lifetime old prefix with a preferred lifetime of 0 and a valid lifetime
of 2 hours (which must be decremented in real time) in a of 2 hours (which must be decremented in real time) in a
Router Advertisement message. Router Advertisement message.
L-15: The IPv6 CE router MUST send an ICMP Destination Unreachable L-15: The IPv6 CE router MUST send an ICMP Destination Unreachable
Message, code 5 (Source address failed ingress/egress policy) Message, code 5 (Source address failed ingress/egress policy)
for packets forwarded to it using an address from a prefix for packets forwarded to it using an address from a prefix
which has been deprecated. which has been deprecated.
L-16: If the IPv6 CE router loses its default route it SHOULD stop
advertising itself as a default router. I.e. by setting the
"Router Lifetime" field to 0 in subsequent Router
Advertisement messages.
4.4. Security Considerations 4.4. Security Considerations
It is considered a best practice to filter obviously malicious It is considered a best practice to filter obviously malicious
traffic (e.g. spoofed packets, "martian" addresses, etc.). Thus, the traffic (e.g. spoofed packets, "martian" addresses, etc.). Thus, the
IPv6 CE router should support basic stateless egress and ingress IPv6 CE router ought to support basic stateless egress and ingress
filters. The CE router should also offer mechanisms to filter filters. The CE router is also expected to offer mechanisms to
traffic entering the customer network; however, the method by which filter traffic entering the customer network; however, the method by
vendors implement configurable packet filtering is beyond the scope which vendors implement configurable packet filtering is beyond the
of this document. scope of this document.
Security requirements: Security requirements:
S-1: The IPv6 CE router SHOULD support S-1: The IPv6 CE router SHOULD support
[I-D.ietf-v6ops-cpe-simple-security]. [I-D.ietf-v6ops-cpe-simple-security]. In particular, the IPv6
CE router SHOULD support functionality sufficient for
implementing the set of recommendations in
[I-D.ietf-v6ops-cpe-simple-security] section 4. Ths document
takes no position on whether such functionality is enabled by
default or mechanisms by which users would configure it.
S-2: The IPv6 CE router MUST support ingress filtering in accordance S-2: The IPv6 CE router MUST support ingress filtering in accordance
with [RFC2827] (BCP 38) with [RFC2827] (BCP 38)
5. Acknowledgements 5. Acknowledgements
Thanks to the following people (in alphabetical order) for their Thanks to the following people (in alphabetical order) for their
guidance and feedback: guidance and feedback:
Mikael Abrahamsson, Merete Asak, Scott Beuker, Mohamed Boucadair, Rex Mikael Abrahamsson, Merete Asak, Scott Beuker, Mohamed Boucadair, Rex
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[I-D.ietf-6man-ipv6-subnet-model] [I-D.ietf-6man-ipv6-subnet-model]
Singh, H., Beebee, W., and E. Nordmark, "IPv6 Subnet Singh, H., Beebee, W., and E. Nordmark, "IPv6 Subnet
Model: the Relationship between Links and Subnet Model: the Relationship between Links and Subnet
Prefixes", draft-ietf-6man-ipv6-subnet-model-12 (work in Prefixes", draft-ietf-6man-ipv6-subnet-model-12 (work in
progress), April 2010. progress), April 2010.
[I-D.ietf-6man-node-req-bis] [I-D.ietf-6man-node-req-bis]
Jankiewicz, E., Loughney, J., and T. Narten, "IPv6 Node Jankiewicz, E., Loughney, J., and T. Narten, "IPv6 Node
Requirements RFC 4294-bis", Requirements RFC 4294-bis",
draft-ietf-6man-node-req-bis-04 (work in progress), draft-ietf-6man-node-req-bis-05 (work in progress),
March 2010. July 2010.
[I-D.ietf-v6ops-cpe-simple-security] [I-D.ietf-v6ops-cpe-simple-security]
Woodyatt, J., "Recommended Simple Security Capabilities in Woodyatt, J., "Recommended Simple Security Capabilities in
Customer Premises Equipment for Providing Residential IPv6 Customer Premises Equipment for Providing Residential IPv6
Internet Service", draft-ietf-v6ops-cpe-simple-security-11 Internet Service", draft-ietf-v6ops-cpe-simple-security-12
(work in progress), April 2010. (work in progress), June 2010.
[RFC1122] Braden, R., "Requirements for Internet Hosts - [RFC1122] Braden, R., "Requirements for Internet Hosts -
Communication Layers", STD 3, RFC 1122, October 1989. Communication Layers", STD 3, RFC 1122, October 1989.
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
[RFC2464] Crawford, M., "Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet [RFC2464] Crawford, M., "Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet
Networks", RFC 2464, December 1998. Networks", RFC 2464, December 1998.
 End of changes. 14 change blocks. 
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