draft-ietf-v6ops-6204bis-03.txt   draft-ietf-v6ops-6204bis-04.txt 
Network Working Group H. Singh Network Working Group H. Singh
Internet-Draft W. Beebee Internet-Draft W. Beebee
Updates: 6204 (if approved) Cisco Systems, Inc. Updates: 6204 (if approved) Cisco Systems, Inc.
Intended status: Informational C. Donley Intended status: Informational C. Donley
Expires: May 25, 2012 CableLabs Expires: June 7, 2012 CableLabs
B. Stark B. Stark
AT&T AT&T
O. Troan, Ed. O. Troan, Ed.
Cisco Systems, Inc. Cisco Systems, Inc.
November 22, 2011 December 5, 2011
Basic Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers Basic Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers
draft-ietf-v6ops-6204bis-03 draft-ietf-v6ops-6204bis-04
Abstract Abstract
This document specifies requirements for an IPv6 Customer Edge (CE) This document specifies requirements for an IPv6 Customer Edge (CE)
router. Specifically, the current version of this document focuses router. Specifically, the current version of this document focuses
on the basic provisioning of an IPv6 CE router and the provisioning on the basic provisioning of an IPv6 CE router and the provisioning
of IPv6 hosts attached to it. The document also covers IP transition of IPv6 hosts attached to it. The document also covers IP transition
technologies and transition technologies coexistence. Two transition technologies and transition technologies coexistence. Two transition
technologies in RFC 5969's 6rd and RFC 6333's DS-Lite. are covered in technologies in RFC 5969's 6rd and RFC 6333's DS-Lite. are covered in
the document. the document.
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on May 25, 2012. This Internet-Draft will expire on June 7, 2012.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2011 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2011 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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4.4. Transition Technologies Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 4.4. Transition Technologies Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
4.4.1. 6rd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 4.4.1. 6rd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
4.4.2. Dual-Stack Lite(DS-Lite) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 4.4.2. Dual-Stack Lite(DS-Lite) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4.4.3. Transition Technologies Coexistence . . . . . . . . . 15 4.4.3. Transition Technologies Coexistence . . . . . . . . . 15
4.5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 4.5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
5. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
6. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 6. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
7. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 7. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
7.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 7.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
7.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 7.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Appendix A. Changes from RFC 6204 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Appendix A. DS-Lite Sunsetting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Appendix B. Changes from RFC 6204 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
This document defines basic IPv6 features for a residential or small- This document defines basic IPv6 features for a residential or small-
office router, referred to as an IPv6 CE router. Typically, these office router, referred to as an IPv6 CE router. Typically, these
routers also support IPv4. routers also support IPv4.
Mixed environments of dual-stack hosts and IPv6-only hosts (behind Mixed environments of dual-stack hosts and IPv6-only hosts (behind
the CE router) can be more complex if the IPv6-only devices are using the CE router) can be more complex if the IPv6-only devices are using
a translator to access IPv4 servers [RFC6144]. Support for such a translator to access IPv4 servers [RFC6144]. Support for such
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router on the LAN interface(s) when it does not have IPv6 router on the LAN interface(s) when it does not have IPv6
connectivity on the WAN interface or when it is not provisioned with connectivity on the WAN interface or when it is not provisioned with
IPv6 addresses. For local IPv6 communication, the mechanisms IPv6 addresses. For local IPv6 communication, the mechanisms
specified in [RFC4191] are used. specified in [RFC4191] are used.
ULA addressing is useful where the IPv6 CE router has multiple LAN ULA addressing is useful where the IPv6 CE router has multiple LAN
interfaces with hosts that need to communicate with each other. If interfaces with hosts that need to communicate with each other. If
the IPv6 CE router has only a single LAN interface (IPv6 link), then the IPv6 CE router has only a single LAN interface (IPv6 link), then
link-local addressing can be used instead. link-local addressing can be used instead.
In the event that more than one IPv6 CE router is present on the LAN, Coexistence with IPv4 requires any IPv6 CE router(s) on the LAN to
then coexistence with IPv4 requires any IPv6 CE router(s) on the LAN conform to these recommendations, especially requirements ULA-5 and
to conform to these recommendations, especially requirements ULA-5 L-4 below.
and L-4 below.
4. Requirements 4. Requirements
4.1. General Requirements 4.1. General Requirements
The IPv6 CE router is responsible for implementing IPv6 routing; that The IPv6 CE router is responsible for implementing IPv6 routing; that
is, the IPv6 CE router must look up the IPv6 destination address in is, the IPv6 CE router must look up the IPv6 destination address in
its routing table to decide to which interface it should send the its routing table to decide to which interface it should send the
packet. packet.
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WAA-2: The IPv6 CE router MUST follow the recommendations in Section WAA-2: The IPv6 CE router MUST follow the recommendations in Section
4 of [RFC5942], and in particular the handling of the L flag 4 of [RFC5942], and in particular the handling of the L flag
in the Router Advertisement Prefix Information option. in the Router Advertisement Prefix Information option.
WAA-3: The IPv6 CE router MUST support DHCPv6 [RFC3315] client WAA-3: The IPv6 CE router MUST support DHCPv6 [RFC3315] client
behavior. behavior.
WAA-4: The IPv6 CE router MUST be able to support the following WAA-4: The IPv6 CE router MUST be able to support the following
DHCPv6 options: IA_NA, Reconfigure Accept [RFC3315], and DHCPv6 options: IA_NA, Reconfigure Accept [RFC3315], and
DNS_SERVERS [RFC3646]. The IPv6 CE router SHOULD be able to DNS_SERVERS [RFC3646]. The IPv6 CE router SHOULD be able to
support the DNS Search List DNSSL option as specfied in support the DNS Search List DNSSL option as specified in
[RFC6106]. [RFC3646].
WAA-5: The IPv6 CE router SHOULD support the DHCPv6 Simple Network WAA-5: The IPv6 CE router SHOULD support the DHCPv6 Simple Network
Time Protocol (SNTP) option [RFC4075] and the Information Time Protocol (SNTP) option [RFC4075] and the Information
Refresh Time option [RFC4242]. Refresh Time option [RFC4242].
WAA-6: If the IPv6 CE router receives a Router Advertisement message WAA-6: If the IPv6 CE router receives a Router Advertisement message
(described in [RFC4861]) with the M flag set to 1, the IPv6 (described in [RFC4861]) with the M flag set to 1, the IPv6
CE router MUST do DHCPv6 address assignment (request an IA_NA CE router MUST do DHCPv6 address assignment (request an IA_NA
option). option).
WAA-7: If the IPv6 CE router does not acquire global IPv6 WAA-7: If the IPv6 CE router does not acquire global IPv6
address(es) from either SLAAC or DHCPv6, then it MUST create address(es) from either SLAAC or DHCPv6, then it MUST create
global IPv6 address(es) from its delegated prefix(es) and global IPv6 address(es) from its delegated prefix(es) and
configure those on one of its internal virtual network configure those on one of its internal virtual network
interfaces unless configured to require a global IPv6 address interfaces, unless explicitly configured to require a global
on the WAN interface. IPv6 address on the WAN interface.
WAA-8: The CE Router MUST parse the DHCPv6 SOL_MAX_RT option WAA-8: The CE Router MUST parse the DHCPv6 SOL_MAX_RT option
[I-D.droms-dhc-dhcpv6-maxsolrt-update] in a received DHCPv6 [I-D.droms-dhc-dhcpv6-maxsolrt-update] in a received DHCPv6
Advertise or Reply message and set its internal SOL_MAX_RT Advertise or Reply message and set its internal SOL_MAX_RT
parameter to the value contained in the SOL_MAX_RT option. parameter to the value contained in the SOL_MAX_RT option.
WAA-9: As a router, the IPv6 CE router MUST follow the weak host WAA-9: As a router, the IPv6 CE router MUST follow the weak host
(Weak ES) model [RFC1122]. When originating packets from an (Weak ES) model [RFC1122]. When originating packets from an
interface, it will use a source address from another one of interface, it will use a source address from another one of
its interfaces if the outgoing interface does not have an its interfaces if the outgoing interface does not have an
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reachable [RFC4632]. reachable [RFC4632].
(a) The IPv6 CE router SHOULD send an ICMPv6 Destination (a) The IPv6 CE router SHOULD send an ICMPv6 Destination
Unreachable message in accordance with Section 3.1 of Unreachable message in accordance with Section 3.1 of
[RFC4443] back to the source of the packet, if the [RFC4443] back to the source of the packet, if the
packet is to be dropped due to this rule. packet is to be dropped due to this rule.
WPD-7: If the IPv6 CE router requests both an IA_NA and an IA_PD WPD-7: If the IPv6 CE router requests both an IA_NA and an IA_PD
option in DHCPv6, it MUST accept an IA_PD option in DHCPv6 option in DHCPv6, it MUST accept an IA_PD option in DHCPv6
Advertise/Reply messages, even if the message does not Advertise/Reply messages, even if the message does not
contain any addresses, unless configured to only obtain its contain any addresses, unless explicitly configured to only
WAN IPv6 address via DHCPv6. obtain its WAN IPv6 address via DHCPv6.
WPD-8: By default, an IPv6 CE router MUST NOT initiate any dynamic WPD-8: By default, an IPv6 CE router MUST NOT initiate any dynamic
routing protocol on its WAN interface. routing protocol on its WAN interface.
4.3. LAN-Side Configuration 4.3. LAN-Side Configuration
The IPv6 CE router distributes configuration information obtained The IPv6 CE router distributes configuration information obtained
during WAN interface provisioning to IPv6 hosts and assists IPv6 during WAN interface provisioning to IPv6 hosts and assists IPv6
hosts in obtaining IPv6 addresses. It also supports connectivity of hosts in obtaining IPv6 addresses. It also supports connectivity of
these devices in the absence of any working WAN interface. these devices in the absence of any working WAN interface.
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destinations. The CE router MAY use other mechanisms to destinations. The CE router MAY use other mechanisms to
configure this. Such mechanisms are outside the scope of configure this. Such mechanisms are outside the scope of
this document. this document.
6RD-4: If 6rd is operational on the IPv6 CE Router, multicast data 6RD-4: If 6rd is operational on the IPv6 CE Router, multicast data
MUST NOT be sent on any 6rd tunnel. MUST NOT be sent on any 6rd tunnel.
6RD-5: The CE Router MUST NOT forward 6RD traffic over a DS-Lite 6RD-5: The CE Router MUST NOT forward 6RD traffic over a DS-Lite
([RFC6333]) tunnel. ([RFC6333]) tunnel.
6RD-6: 6rd MUST NOT be initiated if the WAN-side interface has a CE
IPv4 address [RFC5969] that is not unique within the 6rd
domain.
4.4.2. Dual-Stack Lite(DS-Lite) 4.4.2. Dual-Stack Lite(DS-Lite)
Even as users migrate from IPv4 to IPv6 addressing, a significant Even as users migrate from IPv4 to IPv6 addressing, a significant
percentage of Internet resources and content will remain accessible percentage of Internet resources and content will remain accessible
only through IPv4. Also, many end-user devices will only support only through IPv4. Also, many end-user devices will only support
IPv4. As a consequence, Service Providers require mechanisms to IPv4. As a consequence, Service Providers require mechanisms to
allow customers to continue to access content and resources using allow customers to continue to access content and resources using
IPv4 even after the last IPv4 allocations have been fully depleted. IPv4 even after the last IPv4 allocations have been fully depleted.
One technology that can be used for IPv4 address extension is DS- One technology that can be used for IPv4 address extension is DS-
Lite. Lite.
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DLW-2: If the IPv6 CE Router implements DS-Lite functionality, the DLW-2: If the IPv6 CE Router implements DS-Lite functionality, the
CE Router MUST support using a DS-Lite DHCPv6 option CE Router MUST support using a DS-Lite DHCPv6 option
[RFC6334] to configure the DS-Lite tunnel. The IPv6 CE [RFC6334] to configure the DS-Lite tunnel. The IPv6 CE
Router MAY use other mechanisms to configure DS-Lite Router MAY use other mechanisms to configure DS-Lite
parameters. Such mechanisms are outside the scope of this parameters. Such mechanisms are outside the scope of this
document. document.
DLW-3: IPv6 CE Router MUST NOT perform IPv4 Network Address DLW-3: IPv6 CE Router MUST NOT perform IPv4 Network Address
Translation (NAT) on IPv4 traffic encapsulated using DS-Lite. Translation (NAT) on IPv4 traffic encapsulated using DS-Lite.
DLW-4: If the IPv6 CE Router is configured with a public IPv4 DLW-4: If the IPv6 CE Router is configured with an IPv4 address on
address on its WAN interface, where public IPv4 address is its WAN interface then the IPv6 CE Router SHOULD disable the
defined as any address which is not in the private IP address DS-Lite B4 element.
space specified in [RFC5735], then the IPv6 CE Router SHOULD
disable the DS-Lite B4 element.
DLW-5: If DS-Lite is operational on the IPv6 CE Router, multicast DLW-5: If DS-Lite is operational on the IPv6 CE Router, multicast
data MUST NOT be sent on any DS-Lite tunnel. data MUST NOT be sent on any DS-Lite tunnel.
DLW-6: The CE Router MUST NOT forward DS-Lite traffic over a 6RD DLW-6: The CE Router MUST NOT forward DS-Lite traffic over a 6RD
tunnel. tunnel.
4.4.3. Transition Technologies Coexistence 4.4.3. Transition Technologies Coexistence
Supporting transition technologies that may coexist with native Supporting transition technologies that may coexist with native
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guidance and feedback: guidance and feedback:
Mikael Abrahamsson, Tore Anderson, Merete Asak, Scott Beuker, Mohamed Mikael Abrahamsson, Tore Anderson, Merete Asak, Scott Beuker, Mohamed
Boucadair, Rex Bullinger, Brian Carpenter, Tassos Chatzithomaoglou, Boucadair, Rex Bullinger, Brian Carpenter, Tassos Chatzithomaoglou,
Lorenzo Colitti, Remi Denis-Courmont, Gert Doering, Alain Durand, Lorenzo Colitti, Remi Denis-Courmont, Gert Doering, Alain Durand,
Katsunori Fukuoka, Tony Hain, Thomas Herbst, Kevin Johns, Erik Kline, Katsunori Fukuoka, Tony Hain, Thomas Herbst, Kevin Johns, Erik Kline,
Stephen Kramer, Victor Kuarsingh, Francois-Xavier Le Bail, Arifumi Stephen Kramer, Victor Kuarsingh, Francois-Xavier Le Bail, Arifumi
Matsumoto, David Miles, Shin Miyakawa, Jean-Francois Mule, Michael Matsumoto, David Miles, Shin Miyakawa, Jean-Francois Mule, Michael
Newbery, Carlos Pignataro, John Pomeroy, Antonio Querubin, Hiroki Newbery, Carlos Pignataro, John Pomeroy, Antonio Querubin, Hiroki
Sato, Teemu Savolainen, Matt Schmitt, David Thaler, Mark Townsley, Sato, Teemu Savolainen, Matt Schmitt, David Thaler, Mark Townsley,
Bernie Volz, Dan Wing, James Woodyatt, and Cor Zwart. Bernie Volz, Dan Wing, James Woodyatt, Carl Wuyts, and Cor Zwart.
This document is based in part on CableLabs' eRouter specification. This document is based in part on CableLabs' eRouter specification.
The authors wish to acknowledge the additional contributors from the The authors wish to acknowledge the additional contributors from the
eRouter team: eRouter team:
Ben Bekele, Amol Bhagwat, Ralph Brown, Eduardo Cardona, Margo Dolas, Ben Bekele, Amol Bhagwat, Ralph Brown, Eduardo Cardona, Margo Dolas,
Toerless Eckert, Doc Evans, Roger Fish, Michelle Kuska, Diego Toerless Eckert, Doc Evans, Roger Fish, Michelle Kuska, Diego
Mazzola, John McQueen, Harsh Parandekar, Michael Patrick, Saifur Mazzola, John McQueen, Harsh Parandekar, Michael Patrick, Saifur
Rahman, Lakshmi Raman, Ryan Ross, Ron da Silva, Madhu Sudan, Dan Rahman, Lakshmi Raman, Ryan Ross, Ron da Silva, Madhu Sudan, Dan
Torbet, and Greg White. Torbet, and Greg White.
skipping to change at page 19, line 32 skipping to change at page 19, line 32
[RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless [RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless
Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, September 2007. Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, September 2007.
[RFC4864] Van de Velde, G., Hain, T., Droms, R., Carpenter, B., and [RFC4864] Van de Velde, G., Hain, T., Droms, R., Carpenter, B., and
E. Klein, "Local Network Protection for IPv6", RFC 4864, E. Klein, "Local Network Protection for IPv6", RFC 4864,
May 2007. May 2007.
[RFC5072] S.Varada, Haskins, D., and E. Allen, "IP Version 6 over [RFC5072] S.Varada, Haskins, D., and E. Allen, "IP Version 6 over
PPP", RFC 5072, September 2007. PPP", RFC 5072, September 2007.
[RFC5735] Cotton, M. and L. Vegoda, "Special Use IPv4 Addresses",
BCP 153, RFC 5735, January 2010.
[RFC5942] Singh, H., Beebee, W., and E. Nordmark, "IPv6 Subnet [RFC5942] Singh, H., Beebee, W., and E. Nordmark, "IPv6 Subnet
Model: The Relationship between Links and Subnet Model: The Relationship between Links and Subnet
Prefixes", RFC 5942, July 2010. Prefixes", RFC 5942, July 2010.
[RFC5969] Townsley, W. and O. Troan, "IPv6 Rapid Deployment on IPv4 [RFC5969] Townsley, W. and O. Troan, "IPv6 Rapid Deployment on IPv4
Infrastructures (6rd) -- Protocol Specification", Infrastructures (6rd) -- Protocol Specification",
RFC 5969, August 2010. RFC 5969, August 2010.
[RFC6092] Woodyatt, J., "Recommended Simple Security Capabilities in [RFC6092] Woodyatt, J., "Recommended Simple Security Capabilities in
Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) for Providing Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) for Providing
skipping to change at page 20, line 31 skipping to change at page 20, line 28
Translation", Work in Progress, December 2010. Translation", Work in Progress, December 2010.
[RFC6144] Baker, F., Li, X., Bao, C., and K. Yin, "Framework for [RFC6144] Baker, F., Li, X., Bao, C., and K. Yin, "Framework for
IPv4/IPv6 Translation", RFC 6144, March 2011. IPv4/IPv6 Translation", RFC 6144, March 2011.
[UPnP-IGD] [UPnP-IGD]
UPnP Forum, "Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) Internet UPnP Forum, "Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) Internet
Gateway Device (IGD)", November 2001, Gateway Device (IGD)", November 2001,
<http://www.upnp.org/>. <http://www.upnp.org/>.
Appendix A. Changes from RFC 6204 Appendix A. DS-Lite Sunsetting
Two deployment scenarios of interest are:
1. DHCPv4 address configured on the WAN without DS-Lite configured,
2. and no DHCPv4 address configured on the WAN and DS-Lite
configured.
The service provider enables transitions between these two scenarios
as follows:
From scenario 1 to scenario 2:
a) CE router performs a DHCPv4 message exchange and receives no
address from the service provider.
b) CE router performs a DHCPv6 message exchange and receives an
IA_ADDRESS in an IA_NA and DS-Lite configuration.
c) When DS-Lite is configured, the CE router turns off DHCPv4.
From scenario 2 to scenario 1:
a) CE router performs a DHCPv6 message exchange and receives no
DS-Lite configuration.
b) CE router continues performing a DHCPv4 message exchange until
it receives an address.
Proposed rules (under discussion) to add to the Coexistence section:
1. If the CE router performs a DHCPv6 message exchange and receives
DS-Lite configuration, stop any ongoing DHCPv4 operation.
2. If the CE router performs a DHCPv6 message exchange and does not
receive DS-Lite configuration, perform a DHCPv4 message exchange
to receive an address.
Appendix B. Changes from RFC 6204
1. Added IP transition technologies available in RFC form. 1. Added IP transition technologies available in RFC form.
2. Added IP transition technologies coexistence. 2. Added IP transition technologies coexistence.
3. Changed bullet G-5 to augment the condition of losing IPv6 3. Changed bullet G-5 to augment the condition of losing IPv6
default router(s) with loss of connectivity. default router(s) with loss of connectivity.
4. Removed bullet WAA-7 due to not reaching consensus by various 4. Removed bullet WAA-7 due to not reaching consensus by various
service provider standards bodies. The removal of text does not service provider standards bodies. The removal of text does not
 End of changes. 14 change blocks. 
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