draft-ietf-v6ops-464xlat-05.txt   draft-ietf-v6ops-464xlat-06.txt 
Internet Engineering Task Force M. Mawatari Internet Engineering Task Force M. Mawatari
Internet-Draft Japan Internet Exchange Co.,Ltd. Internet-Draft Japan Internet Exchange Co.,Ltd.
Intended status: BCP M. Kawashima Intended status: BCP M. Kawashima
Expires: January 4, 2013 NEC AccessTechnica, Ltd. Expires: February 8, 2013 NEC AccessTechnica, Ltd.
C. Byrne C. Byrne
T-Mobile USA T-Mobile USA
July 3, 2012 August 7, 2012
464XLAT: Combination of Stateful and Stateless Translation 464XLAT: Combination of Stateful and Stateless Translation
draft-ietf-v6ops-464xlat-05 draft-ietf-v6ops-464xlat-06
Abstract Abstract
This document describes an architecture (464XLAT) for providing This document describes an architecture (464XLAT) for providing
limited IPv4 connectivity across an IPv6-only network by combining limited IPv4 connectivity across an IPv6-only network by combining
existing and well-known stateful protocol translation RFC 6146 in the existing and well-known stateful protocol translation RFC 6146 in the
core and stateless protocol translation RFC 6145 at the edge. 464XLAT core and stateless protocol translation RFC 6145 at the edge. 464XLAT
is a simple and scalable technique to quickly deploy limited IPv4 is a simple and scalable technique to quickly deploy limited IPv4
access service to IPv6-only edge networks without encapsulation. access service to IPv6-only edge networks without encapsulation.
skipping to change at page 1, line 38 skipping to change at page 1, line 37
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on January 4, 2013. This Internet-Draft will expire on February 8, 2013.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must
include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
described in the Simplified BSD License. described in the Simplified BSD License.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. BCP Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3. Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
4. Motivation and Uniqueness of 464XLAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5. Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5. Motivation and Uniqueness of 464XLAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5.1. Wireline Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 6. Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 6.1. Wireline Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
6. Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
6.1. Wireline Network Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 7. Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
6.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . 7 7.1. Wireline Network Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
7. Implementation Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 7.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . 7
7.1. IPv6 Address Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 8. Implementation Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
7.2. IPv4/IPv6 Address Translation Chart . . . . . . . . . . . 7 8.1. IPv6 Address Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
7.2.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT . . . . 7 8.2. IPv4/IPv6 Address Translation Chart . . . . . . . . . . . 7
7.2.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT . . 9 8.2.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT . . . . 7
7.3. IPv6 Prefix Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 8.2.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT . . 9
7.3.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT . . . . 11 8.3. IPv6 Prefix Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
7.3.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT . . 11 8.3.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT . . . . 11
7.4. Traffic Treatment Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8.3.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT . . 11
7.5. DNS Proxy Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8.4. Traffic Treatment Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
7.6. CLAT in a Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8.5. DNS Proxy Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
7.7. CLAT to CLAT communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8.6. CLAT in a Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
8. Deployment Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 8.7. CLAT to CLAT communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
9. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 9. Deployment Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
10. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 10. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
11. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 11. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
12. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 12. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
12.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 13. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
12.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 13.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
13.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Appendix A. Examples of IPv4/IPv6 Address Translation . . . . . . 16 Appendix A. Examples of IPv4/IPv6 Address Translation . . . . . . 16
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
The IANA unallocated IPv4 address pool was exhausted on February 3, The IANA unallocated IPv4 address pool was exhausted on February 3,
2011. Each RIR's unallocated IPv4 address pool will exhaust in the 2011. Each RIR's unallocated IPv4 address pool will exhaust in the
near future. It will be difficult for many networks to assign IPv4 near future. It will be difficult for many networks to assign IPv4
addresses to end users, despite substantial IP connectivity growth addresses to end users, despite substantial IP connectivity growth
required for fast growing edge networks. required for fast growing edge networks.
skipping to change at page 3, line 39 skipping to change at page 3, line 39
possible. The 464XLAT architecture encourages IPv6 transition by possible. The 464XLAT architecture encourages IPv6 transition by
making IPv4 services reachable across IPv6-only networks and making IPv4 services reachable across IPv6-only networks and
providing IPv6 and IPv4 connectivity to single-stack IPv4 or IPv6 providing IPv6 and IPv4 connectivity to single-stack IPv4 or IPv6
servers and peers. servers and peers.
By combining 464XLAT with BIH [RFC6535], it is also possible to By combining 464XLAT with BIH [RFC6535], it is also possible to
provide single IPv4 to IPv6 translation service, which will be needed provide single IPv4 to IPv6 translation service, which will be needed
in the future case of IPv6-only servers and peers to be reached from in the future case of IPv6-only servers and peers to be reached from
legacy IPv4-only hosts across IPv6-only networks. legacy IPv4-only hosts across IPv6-only networks.
2. Requirements Language 2. BCP Scenario
This BCP only applies when the following two criteria are present:
1. There is an IPv6-only access network that uses stateful
translation [RFC6146]
2. There are IPv4-only applications or hosts that must communicate
across the IPv6-only access network to reach the IPv4 Internet
3. Requirements Language
The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
"SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119]. document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].
3. Terminology 4. Terminology
PLAT: PLAT is Provider side translator(XLAT) that complies with PLAT: PLAT is Provider side translator(XLAT) that complies with
[RFC6146]. It translates N:1 global IPv6 packets to global [RFC6146]. It translates N:1 global IPv6 packets to global
IPv4 packets, and vice versa. IPv4 packets, and vice versa.
CLAT: CLAT is Customer side translator(XLAT) that complies with CLAT: CLAT is Customer side translator(XLAT) that complies with
[RFC6145]. It algorithmically translates 1:1 private IPv4 [RFC6145]. It algorithmically translates 1:1 private IPv4
packets to global IPv6 packets, and vice versa. The CLAT packets to global IPv6 packets, and vice versa. The CLAT
function is applicable to a router or an end-node such as a function is applicable to a router or an end-node such as a
mobile phone. CLAT SHOULD perform router function to mobile phone. CLAT SHOULD perform router function to
facilitate packets forwarding through the stateless facilitate packets forwarding through the stateless
skipping to change at page 4, line 26 skipping to change at page 4, line 35
translation, a NAT44 SHOULD be used between the router translation, a NAT44 SHOULD be used between the router
function and the stateless translator function. The CLAT as function and the stateless translator function. The CLAT as
a common home router or 3G router is expected to perform a common home router or 3G router is expected to perform
gateway functions such as DHCP server and DNS proxy for local gateway functions such as DHCP server and DNS proxy for local
clients. The CLAT does not comply with the sentence "Both clients. The CLAT does not comply with the sentence "Both
IPv4-translatable IPv6 addresses and IPv4-converted IPv6 IPv4-translatable IPv6 addresses and IPv4-converted IPv6
addresses SHOULD use the same prefix." that is described on addresses SHOULD use the same prefix." that is described on
Section 3.3 in [RFC6052] due to using different IPv6 prefixes Section 3.3 in [RFC6052] due to using different IPv6 prefixes
for CLAT-side and PLAT-side IPv4 addresses. for CLAT-side and PLAT-side IPv4 addresses.
4. Motivation and Uniqueness of 464XLAT 5. Motivation and Uniqueness of 464XLAT
1. Minimal IPv4 resource requirements, maximum IPv4 efficiency 1. Minimal IPv4 resource requirements, maximum IPv4 efficiency
through statistical multiplexing through statistical multiplexing
2. No new protocols required, quick deployment 2. No new protocols required, quick deployment
3. IPv6-only networks are simpler and therefore less expensive to 3. IPv6-only networks are simpler and therefore less expensive to
operate operate
5. Network Architecture 6. Network Architecture
464XLAT architecture is shown in the following figure. 464XLAT architecture is shown in the following figure.
5.1. Wireline Network Architecture 6.1. Wireline Network Architecture
The private IPv4 host on this diagram can reach global IPv4 hosts via The private IPv4 host on this diagram can reach global IPv4 hosts via
translation on both CLAT and PLAT. On the other hand, the IPv6 host translation on both CLAT and PLAT. On the other hand, the IPv6 host
can reach other IPv6 hosts on the Internet directly without can reach other IPv6 hosts on the Internet directly without
translation. This means that the CPE can not only have the function translation. This means that the CPE can not only have the function
of CLAT but also the function of IPv6 native router for IPv6 native of CLAT but also the function of IPv6 native router for IPv6 native
traffic. traffic.
---- ----
| v6 | | v6 |
skipping to change at page 5, line 28 skipping to change at page 5, line 37
----- | ----- ----- | -----
<- v4p -> XLAT <--------- v6 --------> XLAT <- v4g -> <- v4p -> XLAT <--------- v6 --------> XLAT <- v4g ->
v6 : Global IPv6 v6 : Global IPv6
v4p : Private IPv4 v4p : Private IPv4
v4g : Global IPv4 v4g : Global IPv4
Figure 1: Wireline Network Topology Figure 1: Wireline Network Topology
5.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Architecture 6.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Architecture
The CLAT function on the UE provides an [RFC1918] address and IPv4 The CLAT function on the UE provides an [RFC1918] address and IPv4
default route. The applications on the UE can use the private IPv4 default route. The applications on the UE can use the private IPv4
address for reaching global IPv4 hosts via translation on both CLAT address for reaching global IPv4 hosts via translation on both CLAT
and PLAT. On the other hand, reaching IPv6 hosts (including host and PLAT. On the other hand, reaching IPv6 hosts (including host
presented via DNS64 [RFC6147]) does not require the CLAT function on presented via DNS64 [RFC6147]) does not require the CLAT function on
the UE. the UE.
---- ----
| v6 | | v6 |
skipping to change at page 6, line 35 skipping to change at page 6, line 35
+----------------------+ ----- +----------------------+ -----
<- v4p -> XLAT <--------- v6 --------> XLAT <- v4g -> <- v4p -> XLAT <--------- v6 --------> XLAT <- v4g ->
v6 : Global IPv6 v6 : Global IPv6
v4p : Private IPv4 v4p : Private IPv4
v4g : Global IPv4 v4g : Global IPv4
Figure 2: Wireless 3GPP Network Topology Figure 2: Wireless 3GPP Network Topology
6. Applicability 7. Applicability
6.1. Wireline Network Applicability 7.1. Wireline Network Applicability
When an ISP has IPv6 464XLAT, the ISP can provide outgoing IPv4 When an ISP has IPv6 464XLAT, the ISP can provide outgoing IPv4
service to end users across an IPv6 access network. The result is service to end users across an IPv6 access network. The result is
that edge network growth is no longer tightly coupled to the that edge network growth is no longer tightly coupled to the
availability of scarce IPv4 addresses. availability of scarce IPv4 addresses.
If the IXP or another provider operates the PLAT, the edge ISP is If the IXP or another provider operates the PLAT, the edge ISP is
only required to deploy an IPv6 access network. All ISPs do not need only required to deploy an IPv6 access network. All ISPs do not need
IPv4 access networks. They can migrate their access network to a IPv4 access networks. They can migrate their access network to a
simple and highly scalable IPv6-only environment. simple and highly scalable IPv6-only environment.
Incidentally, the effectiveness of 464XLAT was confirmed in the WIDE Incidentally, the effectiveness of 464XLAT was confirmed in the WIDE
camp Spring 2012. The result is described in camp Spring 2012. The result is described in
[I-D.hazeyama-widecamp-ipv6-only-experience]. [I-D.hazeyama-widecamp-ipv6-only-experience].
6.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Applicability 7.2. Wireless 3GPP Network Applicability
The vast majority of mobile networks are compliant to Pre-Release 9 The vast majority of mobile networks are compliant to Pre-Release 9
3GPP standards. In Pre-Release 9 3GPP networks, GSM and UMTS 3GPP standards. In Pre-Release 9 3GPP networks, GSM and UMTS
networks must signal and support both IPv4 and IPv6 Packet Data networks must signal and support both IPv4 and IPv6 Packet Data
Protocol (PDP) attachments to access IPv4 and IPv6 network Protocol (PDP) attachments to access IPv4 and IPv6 network
destinations [RFC6459]. Since there are 2 PDPs required to support 2 destinations [RFC6459]. Since there are 2 PDPs required to support 2
address families, this is double the number of PDPs required to address families, this is double the number of PDPs required to
support the status quo of 1 address family, which is IPv4. support the status quo of 1 address family, which is IPv4.
464XLAT in combination with stateful translation [RFC6146] and DNS64 464XLAT in combination with stateful translation [RFC6146] and DNS64
skipping to change at page 7, line 34 skipping to change at page 7, line 34
function and passed to the IPv6-only mobile network, destine to the function and passed to the IPv6-only mobile network, destine to the
PLAT. In summary, the UE has the CLAT function that does a stateless PLAT. In summary, the UE has the CLAT function that does a stateless
translation [RFC6145], but only when required. The mobile network translation [RFC6145], but only when required. The mobile network
has a PLAT that does stateful translation [RFC6146]. has a PLAT that does stateful translation [RFC6146].
464XLAT works with today's existing systems as much as possible. 464XLAT works with today's existing systems as much as possible.
464XLAT is compatible with existing network based deep packet 464XLAT is compatible with existing network based deep packet
inspection solutions like 3GPP standardized Policy and Charging inspection solutions like 3GPP standardized Policy and Charging
Control (PCC) [TS.23203]. Control (PCC) [TS.23203].
7. Implementation Considerations 8. Implementation Considerations
7.1. IPv6 Address Format 8.1. IPv6 Address Format
IPv6 address format in 464XLAT is defined in Section 2.2 of IPv6 address format in 464XLAT is defined in Section 2.2 of
[RFC6052]. [RFC6052].
7.2. IPv4/IPv6 Address Translation Chart 8.2. IPv4/IPv6 Address Translation Chart
7.2.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT 8.2.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT
This case should be used when a prefix delegation mechanism such as This case should be used when a prefix delegation mechanism such as
DHCPv6-PD [RFC3633] is available to assign a dedicated translation DHCPv6-PD [RFC3633] is available to assign a dedicated translation
prefix to the CLAT. prefix to the CLAT.
Source IPv4 address Source IPv4 address
+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+
| Global IPv4 address | | Global IPv4 address |
| assigned to IPv4 pool@PLAT | | assigned to IPv4 pool@PLAT |
+--------+ +----------------------------+ +--------+ +----------------------------+
skipping to change at page 9, line 5 skipping to change at page 9, line 5
| IPv4 | | assigned to IPv4 client | | IPv4 | | assigned to IPv4 client |
| client | +----------------------------+ | client | +----------------------------+
+--------+ Destination IPv4 address +--------+ Destination IPv4 address
+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+
| Global IPv4 address | | Global IPv4 address |
| assigned to IPv4 server | | assigned to IPv4 server |
+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+
Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT
7.2.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT 8.2.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT
This case should be used when a prefix delegation mechanism is not This case should be used when a prefix delegation mechanism is not
available to assign a dedicated translation prefix to the CLAT. In available to assign a dedicated translation prefix to the CLAT. In
this case, NAT44 SHOULD be used so that all IPv4 source addresses are this case, NAT44 SHOULD be used so that all IPv4 source addresses are
mapped to a single IPv6 address. mapped to a single IPv6 address.
Source IPv4 address Source IPv4 address
+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+
| Global IPv4 address | | Global IPv4 address |
| assigned to IPv4 pool@PLAT | | assigned to IPv4 pool@PLAT |
skipping to change at page 11, line 5 skipping to change at page 11, line 5
| IPv4 | | assigned to IPv4 client | | IPv4 | | assigned to IPv4 client |
| client | +----------------------------+ | client | +----------------------------+
+--------+ Destination IPv4 address +--------+ Destination IPv4 address
+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+
| Global IPv4 address | | Global IPv4 address |
| assigned to IPv4 server | | assigned to IPv4 server |
+----------------------------+ +----------------------------+
Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT
7.3. IPv6 Prefix Handling 8.3. IPv6 Prefix Handling
7.3.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT 8.3.1. Case of enabling only stateless XLATE on CLAT
From the delegated DHCPv6 [RFC3633] prefix, a /64 is dedicated to From the delegated DHCPv6 [RFC3633] prefix, a /64 is dedicated to
source and receive IPv6 packets associated with the stateless source and receive IPv6 packets associated with the stateless
translation [RFC6145]. translation [RFC6145].
The CLAT MAY discover the Pref64::/n of the PLAT via some method such The CLAT MAY discover the Pref64::/n of the PLAT via some method such
as DHCPv6 option, TR-069, DNS APL RR [RFC3123] or as DHCPv6 option, TR-069, DNS APL RR [RFC3123] or
[I-D.ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic]. [I-D.ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic].
7.3.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT 8.3.2. Case of enabling NAT44 and stateless XLATE on CLAT
In the case that DHCPv6-PD [RFC3633] is not available, the CLAT does In the case that DHCPv6-PD [RFC3633] is not available, the CLAT does
not have dedicated IPv6 prefix for translation. If the CLAT does not not have dedicated IPv6 prefix for translation. If the CLAT does not
have a dedicated IPv6 prefix for translation, the CLAT can perform have a dedicated IPv6 prefix for translation, the CLAT can perform
with NAT44 and stateless translation [RFC6145]. with NAT44 and stateless translation [RFC6145].
Incoming source IPv4 packets from the LAN of [RFC1918] addresses are Incoming source IPv4 packets from the LAN of [RFC1918] addresses are
NAT44 to the CLAT IPv4 host address. Then, the CLAT will do a NAT44 to the CLAT IPv4 host address. Then, the CLAT will do a
stateless translation [RFC6145] so that the IPv4 packets from the stateless translation [RFC6145] so that the IPv4 packets from the
CLAT IPv4 host address are translated to the CLAT WAN IPv6 address as CLAT IPv4 host address are translated to the CLAT WAN IPv6 address as
described in [RFC6052]. described in [RFC6052].
Its subnet prefix is made of the delegated prefix, completed if Its subnet prefix is made of the delegated prefix, completed if
needed to a /64 by a subnet ID = 0. Its interface ID is the 464XLAT needed to a /64 by a subnet ID = 0. Its interface ID is the 464XLAT
interface ID (Section 10). interface ID (Section 10).
The CLAT MAY discover the Pref64::/n of the PLAT via some method such The CLAT MAY discover the Pref64::/n of the PLAT via some method such
as TR-069, DNS APL RR [RFC3123] or as TR-069, DNS APL RR [RFC3123] or
[I-D.ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic]. [I-D.ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic].
7.4. Traffic Treatment Scenarios 8.4. Traffic Treatment Scenarios
+--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+ +--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+
| Server | Application | Traffic Treatment | Location of | | Server | Application | Traffic Treatment | Location of |
| | and Host | | Translation | | | and Host | | Translation |
+--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+ +--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+
| IPv6 | IPv6 | End-to-end IPv6 | None | | IPv6 | IPv6 | End-to-end IPv6 | None |
+--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+ +--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+
| IPv4 | IPv6 | Stateful Translation | PLAT | | IPv4 | IPv6 | Stateful Translation | PLAT |
+--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+ +--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+
| IPv4 | IPv4 | 464XLAT | PLAT/CLAT | | IPv4 | IPv4 | 464XLAT | PLAT/CLAT |
+--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+ +--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+
| IPv6 | IPv4 | Stateless Translation | CLAT | | IPv6 | IPv4 | Stateless Translation | CLAT |
+--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+ +--------+-------------+-----------------------+-------------+
Traffic Treatment Scenarios Traffic Treatment Scenarios
The above chart shows most common traffic types and traffic The above chart shows most common traffic types and traffic
treatment. treatment.
7.5. DNS Proxy Implementation 8.5. DNS Proxy Implementation
The CLAT SHOULD implement a DNS proxy as defined in [RFC5625]. The The CLAT SHOULD implement a DNS proxy as defined in [RFC5625]. The
case of an IPv4-only node behind CLAT querying an IPv4 DNS server is case of an IPv4-only node behind CLAT querying an IPv4 DNS server is
undesirable since it requires both stateful and stateless translation undesirable since it requires both stateful and stateless translation
for each DNS lookup. The CLAT SHOULD set itself as the DNS server for each DNS lookup. The CLAT SHOULD set itself as the DNS server
via DHCP or other means and proxy DNS queries for IPv4 and IPv6 via DHCP or other means and proxy DNS queries for IPv4 and IPv6
clients. Using the CLAT enabled home router or UE as a DNS proxy is clients. Using the CLAT enabled home router or UE as a DNS proxy is
a normal consume gateway function and simplifies the traffic flow so a normal consume gateway function and simplifies the traffic flow so
that only IPv6 native queries are made across the access network. that only IPv6 native queries are made across the access network.
The CLAT SHOULD allow for a client to query any DNS server of its The CLAT SHOULD allow for a client to query any DNS server of its
choice and bypass the proxy. choice and bypass the proxy.
7.6. CLAT in a Gateway 8.6. CLAT in a Gateway
The CLAT is a stateless translation feature which can be implemented The CLAT is a stateless translation feature which can be implemented
in a common home router or mobile phone that has a mobile router in a common home router or mobile phone that has a mobile router
feature. The router with CLAT function SHOULD provide common router feature. The router with CLAT function SHOULD provide common router
services such as DHCP of [RFC1918] addresses, DHCPv6, and DNS services such as DHCP of [RFC1918] addresses, DHCPv6, and DNS
service. The router SHOULD set itself as the DNS server advertised service. The router SHOULD set itself as the DNS server advertised
via DHCP or other means to the clients so that it may implement the via DHCP or other means to the clients so that it may implement the
DNS proxy function to avoid double translation of DNS request. DNS proxy function to avoid double translation of DNS request.
7.7. CLAT to CLAT communications 8.7. CLAT to CLAT communications
While CLAT to CLAT IPv4 communication may work when the client IPv4 While CLAT to CLAT IPv4 communication may work when the client IPv4
subnets do not overlap, this traffic flow is out of scope. 464XLAT is subnets do not overlap, this traffic flow is out of scope. 464XLAT is
a hub and spoke architecture focused on enabling IPv4-only services a hub and spoke architecture focused on enabling IPv4-only services
over IPv6-only access networks. over IPv6-only access networks.
8. Deployment Considerations 9. Deployment Considerations
Even if the Internet access provider for consumers is different from Even if the Internet access provider for consumers is different from
the PLAT provider (e.g. another internet access provider), it can the PLAT provider (e.g. another internet access provider), it can
implement traffic engineering independently from the PLAT provider. implement traffic engineering independently from the PLAT provider.
Detailed reasons are below: Detailed reasons are below:
1. The Internet access provider for consumers can figure out IPv4 1. The Internet access provider for consumers can figure out IPv4
destination address from translated IPv6 packet header, so it can destination address from translated IPv6 packet header, so it can
implement traffic engineering based on IPv4 destination address implement traffic engineering based on IPv4 destination address
(e.g. traffic monitoring for each IPv4 destination address, (e.g. traffic monitoring for each IPv4 destination address,
skipping to change at page 13, line 38 skipping to change at page 13, line 38
"IPv4/IPv6 translation packets"), and implement traffic "IPv4/IPv6 translation packets"), and implement traffic
engineering based on IPv6 prefix. engineering based on IPv6 prefix.
This 464XLAT architecture has two capabilities. One is a IPv4 -> This 464XLAT architecture has two capabilities. One is a IPv4 ->
IPv6 -> IPv4 translation for sharing global IPv4 addresses, another, IPv6 -> IPv4 translation for sharing global IPv4 addresses, another,
if combined with BIH [RFC6535], is a IPv4 -> IPv6 translation for if combined with BIH [RFC6535], is a IPv4 -> IPv6 translation for
reaching IPv6-only servers from IPv4-only clients that can not reaching IPv6-only servers from IPv4-only clients that can not
support IPv6. IPv4-only clients must be support through the long support IPv6. IPv4-only clients must be support through the long
period of global transition to IPv6. period of global transition to IPv6.
9. Security Considerations 10. Security Considerations
To implement a PLAT, see security considerations presented in Section To implement a PLAT, see security considerations presented in Section
5 of [RFC6146]. 5 of [RFC6146].
To implement a CLAT, see security considerations presented in Section To implement a CLAT, see security considerations presented in Section
7 of [RFC6145]. The CLAT MAY comply with [RFC6092]. 7 of [RFC6145]. The CLAT MAY comply with [RFC6092].
10. IANA Considerations 11. IANA Considerations
IANA is requested to reserve a Modified EUI-64 identifier for 464XLAT IANA is requested to reserve a Modified EUI-64 identifier for 464XLAT
according to section 2.2.2 of [RFC5342]. Its suggested value is 02- according to section 2.2.2 of [RFC5342]. Its suggested value is 02-
00-5E-00-00-00-00-00 to 02-00-5E-0F-FF-FF-FF-FF or 02-00-5E-10-00-00- 00-5E-00-00-00-00-00 to 02-00-5E-0F-FF-FF-FF-FF or 02-00-5E-10-00-00-
00-00 to 02-00-5E-EF-FF-FF-FF-FF, depending on whether it should be 00-00 to 02-00-5E-EF-FF-FF-FF-FF, depending on whether it should be
taken in reserved or available values. taken in reserved or available values.
11. Acknowledgements 12. Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank JPIX NOC members, JPIX 464XLAT trial The authors would like to thank JPIX NOC members, JPIX 464XLAT trial
service members, Seiichi Kawamura, Dan Drown, Brian Carpenter, Rajiv service members, Seiichi Kawamura, Dan Drown, Brian Carpenter, Rajiv
Asati, Washam Fan, Behcet Sarikaya, Jan Zorz, Tatsuya Oishi, Lorenzo Asati, Washam Fan, Behcet Sarikaya, Jan Zorz, Tatsuya Oishi, Lorenzo
Colitti, Erik Kline, Ole Troan, Maoke Chen, Gang Chen, Tom Petch, and Colitti, Erik Kline, Ole Troan, Maoke Chen, Gang Chen, Tom Petch, and
Jouni Korhonen for their helpful comments. Special acknowledgments Jouni Korhonen for their helpful comments. Special acknowledgments
go to Remi Despres for his plentiful supports and suggestions, go to Remi Despres for his plentiful supports and suggestions,
especially about using NAT44 with IANA's EUI-64 ID. We also would especially about using NAT44 with IANA's EUI-64 ID. We also would
like to thank Fred Baker and Joel Jaeggli for their support. like to thank Fred Baker and Joel Jaeggli for their support.
12. References 13. References
12.1. Normative References 13.1. Normative References
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
[RFC6052] Bao, C., Huitema, C., Bagnulo, M., Boucadair, M., and X. [RFC6052] Bao, C., Huitema, C., Bagnulo, M., Boucadair, M., and X.
Li, "IPv6 Addressing of IPv4/IPv6 Translators", RFC 6052, Li, "IPv6 Addressing of IPv4/IPv6 Translators", RFC 6052,
October 2010. October 2010.
[RFC6144] Baker, F., Li, X., Bao, C., and K. Yin, "Framework for [RFC6144] Baker, F., Li, X., Bao, C., and K. Yin, "Framework for
IPv4/IPv6 Translation", RFC 6144, April 2011. IPv4/IPv6 Translation", RFC 6144, April 2011.
[RFC6145] Li, X., Bao, C., and F. Baker, "IP/ICMP Translation [RFC6145] Li, X., Bao, C., and F. Baker, "IP/ICMP Translation
Algorithm", RFC 6145, April 2011. Algorithm", RFC 6145, April 2011.
[RFC6146] Bagnulo, M., Matthews, P., and I. van Beijnum, "Stateful [RFC6146] Bagnulo, M., Matthews, P., and I. van Beijnum, "Stateful
NAT64: Network Address and Protocol Translation from IPv6 NAT64: Network Address and Protocol Translation from IPv6
Clients to IPv4 Servers", RFC 6146, April 2011. Clients to IPv4 Servers", RFC 6146, April 2011.
12.2. Informative References 13.2. Informative References
[I-D.hazeyama-widecamp-ipv6-only-experience] [I-D.hazeyama-widecamp-ipv6-only-experience]
Hazeyama, H., Hiromi, R., Ishihara, T., and O. Nakamura, Hazeyama, H., Hiromi, R., Ishihara, T., and O. Nakamura,
"Experiences from IPv6-Only Networks with Transition "Experiences from IPv6-Only Networks with Transition
Technologies in the WIDE Camp Spring 2012", Technologies in the WIDE Camp Spring 2012",
draft-hazeyama-widecamp-ipv6-only-experience-01 (work in draft-hazeyama-widecamp-ipv6-only-experience-01 (work in
progress), March 2012. progress), March 2012.
[I-D.ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic] [I-D.ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic]
Savolainen, T., Korhonen, J., and D. Wing, "Discovery of Savolainen, T., Korhonen, J., and D. Wing, "Discovery of
IPv6 Prefix Used for IPv6 Address Synthesis", IPv6 Prefix Used for IPv6 Address Synthesis",
draft-ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic-10 (work in draft-ietf-behave-nat64-discovery-heuristic-11 (work in
progress), June 2012. progress), July 2012.
[RFC1918] Rekhter, Y., Moskowitz, R., Karrenberg, D., Groot, G., and [RFC1918] Rekhter, Y., Moskowitz, R., Karrenberg, D., Groot, G., and
E. Lear, "Address Allocation for Private Internets", E. Lear, "Address Allocation for Private Internets",
BCP 5, RFC 1918, February 1996. BCP 5, RFC 1918, February 1996.
[RFC3123] Koch, P., "A DNS RR Type for Lists of Address Prefixes [RFC3123] Koch, P., "A DNS RR Type for Lists of Address Prefixes
(APL RR)", RFC 3123, June 2001. (APL RR)", RFC 3123, June 2001.
[RFC3633] Troan, O. and R. Droms, "IPv6 Prefix Options for Dynamic [RFC3633] Troan, O. and R. Droms, "IPv6 Prefix Options for Dynamic
Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) version 6", RFC 3633, Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) version 6", RFC 3633,
 End of changes. 35 change blocks. 
63 lines changed or deleted 74 lines changed or added

This html diff was produced by rfcdiff 1.41. The latest version is available from http://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcdiff/