* WGs marked with an * asterisk has had at least one new draft made available during the last 5 days

Tips for Authors on Getting Through IESG Review

Authors trying to publish documents in the IETF have a tough job to do. Their documents are expected to take into consideration many different aspects of Internet engineering, ranging from transport to security to manageability. The major purpose of the IETF review process is to ensure that all of these aspects are addressed.

Obviously, the IETF process works most smoothly when authors take all these considerations into account as they're writing the document. It's not pleasant to have to rewrite an entire document to address a security issue, especially after months of working group process. If authors can be made aware of the high-level points they need to address, however, they can be proactive in ensuring that they address the questions that are likely to arise during the IETF review process.

The purpose of this document is to collect the top questions that reviewers from each area ask about a protocol, in order to help authors think about how to answer these questions (and hopefully include the answers in their documents!). This list is clearly not comprehensive, but it should allow authors to make a good first pass. In addition, contact points are provided in case authors have questions in a given area.

Routing

Key questions:

  • TODO

For further questions:

  • TODO

Transport

Key questions:

  • TODO

For further questions:

Internet

Key questions:

  • TODO

For further questions:

  • TODO

Operations & Management

Key questions (details in RFC 5706):

  • Has deployment been discussed?
  • Has installation and initial setup been discussed?
  • Has the migration path been discussed?
  • Have the requirements on other protocols and functional components been discussed?
  • Has the impact on network operation been discussed?
  • Have suggestions for verifying correct operation been discussed?
  • Has management interoperability been discussed?
  • Are there fault or threshold conditions that should be reported?
  • Is configuration discussed?
  • Is management information discussed?
  • Is fault management discussed?
  • Is configuration management discussed?
  • Is accounting management discussed?
  • Is performance management discussed?
  • Is security management discussed?

Note: RFC 6632, "An Overview of the IETF Network Management Standards" might help whenever it's time to select an existing protocol and/or data model. Specifically the "Appendix A. High-Level Classification of Management Protocols and Data Models"

For further questions:

Security

Key questions:

  • TODO

For further questions:

Applications

Key questions:

  • TODO

For further questions:

Real-Time Applications and Infrastructure

Key questions:

  • TODO

For further questions: